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Favourite Food

&

Travel quotes

 

When he heard there was nothing to eat, he sat down and wept… “Why did I ever wake up!” he cried. -J.R.R. Tolkien, The Hobbit

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Travel opens your mind as few other things do. It is its own form of hypnotism, and I am forever under its spell. - Libba Bray, Rebel Angels

 



National days.....

 

Lithuania 16 February (Lithuanian State Re-establishment Day, declaration of independence from Russia and Germany 1918)

On the menu in Lithuania....

Lithuanian trivia: Six hundred years ago Lithuania was one of the largest countries in Europe.

 


 

Kosovo 17 February (see 2008 Kosovo declaration of independence)

On Kosovo's menu....

Kosovo trivia: It is Europe's newest country.

 


 

Gambia 18 February (Independence Day, from the United Kingdom 1965)

On the menu in Gambia....

Trivia for Gambia: The land area of The Gambia into the UK 206 times!

 


 

Nepal 18 February (Martyr's Day)

Eating in Nepal...

Trivia for Nepal: The word Himalaya means 'the home or abode of snow'.

 


 

Brunei 23 February (Independence Day)

On the Brunei table...

Did you know this about Brunei? Brunei consists of two unconnected parts.

 


 

Guyana 23 February (Republic Day, also known as Mashramani, republic 1970).

The food of Guyana....

Guyanan trivia: Guyana is the only country in South America where English is the official language.

 


 

Estonia 24 February (Independence Day, declaration of independence from the Russia 1918)

What people eat in Estonia....

Trivia: The Estonian language is not related to its neighbours. It is Finno-Ugric and related to Finnish and Hungarian.

 


 

Kuwait 25 February (National Day) (26 February is Liberation Day, from Iraq 1991)

On the table in Kuwait...

Trivia: The national bird of Kuwait is the falcon.

 


 

Dominican Republic 27 February (independence from Haiti 1844),

What's on the table...

Trivia: The world's largest pot of Sancocho (a meaty local stew) was prepared at the 7th Dominican Fair at La Sirena February 12, 2007. It fed three thousand people.

 


 

 

AndalusiaSpain 28 February (Dia de Andalucia)

The food of Andalucia...

Trivia: Andalusia has the only rainforest on all of the Mediterranean coastline.

 


 

See all National Days for FEBRUARY

 


 

Food related events....

Strangest US food festivals in 2016

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Food festivals WORLDWIDE in

FEBRUARY

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Food related events on this date in history!

 


 

oldfoodie

...visit The Old Foodie.

 



 

See where we have been...

24 percent of the world's countries!

 


 

Australian travellers - do you need a visa?

Check the visa requirements by country...

Read more....

Find out which visas are the most difficult to receive....

 


 

PACKING FOR A TRIP?

Pack safe. Here's how to know what is allowed and what is BANNED.  

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Here's an update on the US HAZMAT rules for aircraft luggage.

 

 

 

traveltipstop

Just wish you could sleep comfortably on a plane?

Maybe now you can....

 

 


food_of_week_02

This may be more the 'food of later in the century' but we are told they are on their way!

Are you brave enough to try them?

 


triviatop

ciaos

It's a New Year on the Chinese calendar.  Here are some fun Chinese sayings.......

........about food!

 

 

 

Want to cruise a French canal but...

 ....without the responsibility of being skipper? 


 

 

books

.............and Apps and DVDs


 

Start planning for Tokyo 2020 Olympics or go earlier.

This guide is what you need....

 


 

Did you think salads were only for summer?

Think again!....

 


 

Always wanted to visit Turkey? You've been, and loved the food?

This book is for you....

 


 

One of Australia's top chefs, shares good and tasty dishes for home cooks.

Read more here...

 


 

It's that 'sweet spot' of the year when some sugary treats are even more welcome.

Sweeten up your life....

 


 

Trivia buffs - this book is for you.

Especially if you love to travel...

 


Just in time for the holiday season.

Check your favourite wineries....

 


 

Three cities full of secrets.

     

Learn where they are.....

 


 

Take a trip to stylish Amsterdam!

It will be worth the trip....

 


 

The world's BIGGEST bread cookbook.

See for yourself...

 


 

A true story of survival of a family and the cuisine of their homeland.

A must-read....

 


If you love a bit of mystery and wackiness with your travel, this book is for you.

Find out all about it....

 


 

There is much more to Rio de Janeiro than meets the eye.

Discover its secrets....

 


 

Do you need some travel ideas? Here are 1001 historic sites to visit.

Start planning now...

 


 

Ah, Chocolate! Here presented by 'the queen of chocolate'!

Find out more....

 


 

If you always thought cooking Indian was too difficult....

... think again and see how easy it can be.

 


 

Find out what Edinburgh has been hiding.

Read more here.....

 


 

Need somewhere to rest during a busy day in London?

Here are about a hundred ideas....

 


 

Do you love Paris? Would you like to really know your way around?

This book will show you how...

 


 

Favourite cookery book writer Anneke Manning, opens her BakeClub files.

See what she is sharing...

 


 

What's for dinner? Now you kn ow with the help of this expert.

Nadia's book has the answers....

 


 

Is there such a thing as a quiet spot in Los Angeles?

This book shares 120 of them....

 


 

If you love food and travel equally, this new novel might satisfy your hunger.

Take a look....

 


 

If you think you know Australia well, you need to see this book and realise there is still more.

Read more...

 


 

Sydney has many precincts and now you may explore them.

See what you may have been missing out on....

 


 

Have you been to Berlin? This book will make you want to visit.

Read more....

 


 

Something for every day of the year from famous writers and speakers through the ages.

Read more.....

 


 

Now you can cook all your favourite foods from Japan's capital.

Find out about it...

 


 

Here's a book with double value.

Find out what it is.....

 


 

India has some of the best vegatarian dishes in the world.

Find them in this new book....

 


 

Chef-farmer Matthew Evans helps us through hot weather cooking.

Read more...

 


 

Could this be the el Bulli of Australia?

Find out why.....

 


 

Spend some time with Australia's 'Queen of Nyona'.

Learn her history and Asian cooking secrets....

 


 

Looking for a way to spend your weekends in Australia in 2016? 

Here are 52 suggestions complete with things to do and places to eat....

Read more..

 


 

 

Hate waste? Want to feed your family healthily?

Get preserving....

 


 

Frustrated by a fridge full of leftovers? Don't know what to do with them?

Your worries are over....

 


 

It's not often a Michelin-starred chef shares his favourite home-style recipes.

Get the help of an expert...

 


 

Attention! All those who thought they would never cook Japanese food at home!

A leading chef show you how....

 


 

How to eat like an Italian! 

Fratelli Fresh's Barry McDonald gives the recipes you need....

 


 

Lovers of Middle Eastern food will devour this book - and its wonderful recipes.

Read more...

 


 

Too old to colour-in? Not with this delightful book.

Release your inner child...

 


Michelin starred chef Jason Atherton would like to assist you in your kitchen...

.... that is, his amazing dessert cookbook will.

 


 

Outback food from a Masterchef contestant.

See what the country has to offer....

 


NEW from Lonely Planet

&

See more...

 


 

Meatballs for everyone - from the Meatball and Wine Bar.

Read about them...

 


 

Lovers of food and beer, need to see this latest book from Ross Dobson.

Find out more.....

 


 

Perfect for summer. Hartsyard shares its secrets.

Learn them all....


 

Aimed at the food industry, but also valuable for home cooks, this tongue-in-cheek book might make you think.

Read more...

 


 

One of the delights of travel is eating on the street.

This book helps you cook the food at home too...

 


 

One family of foods can help you eat your way to health!

Find out how....

 


 

Heart-shaped Tasmania is all about good food.

Find out who is making it even better ........

 


 

How big is your garden? Even a tiny courtyard is big enough to add to your menu.

Find out how....

 


 

The best of the best. Iconic cookery teacher Gretta Anna's recipes with her son Martin Teplitzky.

See it here....

 


 

Food is art - and here, a master chef  marries Italian cuisine and painting.

Find out more about a truly beautiful book ...

 


For those who love the world and its beauty and want a REAL life.....

.....this is the book for you.

 


 

Fancy some fishing - with a chef and TV celebrity and two other seafood experts?

Go fishing (and cooking) with these there....

 


 

Heading for Hong Kong? Take this book (and an appetite) with you!

Read all about it.....

 


Explore 19 areas and discover Tokyo's best food and shopping.

Read more....

 


 

Everyone's favourite grandmother and cook, as known by her grand-daughter, Kate Gibbs....

....sharing her recipes for life , and for the kitchen

 


 

Now you can create your own home patisserie.

A top French patissier shows how....

 


 

Does Australia have the world's best beaches?

Find out where Australia's best ones are....


 

Join five women for a weekly meal in Umbria, Italy - simple, but so much more.

Find out about this beautiful book... 

 


You probably know of Rick Stein from his TV and cookbook fame, as well as his restaurants...

..but now you can get to know him from his memoir

 


Put the Taste of Australia into your meals with Lyndey Milan's latest book.

Read more....

 


Love cooking, like trivia?

This book is for you!

 

 

 

 

 

Taste Taipei

Frog's eggs, a rock princess, and cake in a cake!

If you thought Taiwanese food was all about bubble tea, you are formally invited to come along on this mouthwatering ride.

'Come here, buy these!' 

The friendly stallholder didn't exactly say those words in English, but we knew what she meant. Her words were as impossible to understand as the sign at her stall, though we could smell the pork and rice filling she had carefully wrapped in bamboo leaves, then steamed. The dumplings were strung up in bundles that her other customers – the ones who knew what they were and could understand her Chinese words, and the sign – were carrying off home for dinner. Bak chang, the ideal takeaway.

But her smile said it all. Here we were in the small daytime Beito market in Taipei, Taiwan's capital – the city where food speaks all languages.

It seems pale green was the fashion choice for fruit and vegetables that day. This is a loofah (luffa), a large vegetable of the cucumber family which grows on a vine. And if you think the name is familiar and more likely to be in your bathroom rather than your kitchen, then you are right!

This is sometimes called a 'vegetable sponge', and when dried becomes that useful scrubbing tool you might take with you to the shower. For those who would rather cook it, then luffa is best diced and added to stir-fries or soups.

...and, no, these are not custard apples. They are sugar apples (a relative of custard apples and sometimes called 'sweetsop' - as opposed to soursops). All this we were told by the chef who accompanied us on our tour. Our friendly market guide was not just any chef, though.

Chef Li Chao-Ming is the executive chef at the nearby The Gaia Hotel where he had also invited us to a very special lunch.

And this turned out to be not any regular meal either. The seven courses began with this tempting tasting plate.

Let's take a tour, starting at the top row, from the left: a flower, just to set the tone, a diamond of bamboo shoot, a steamed tuberose bud with a dab of mayonnaise. Middle row: black fungus on cucumber, pig ear stack, smoked duck breast. Bottom row: chicken and garlic sauce, butter icing and a chocolate disc with the Gaia emblem, pork and chilli bundle.

There was a tray of taro, anchovies and chilli, cabbage and fermented tofu as accompaniments, then a Sichuan platter (yes, fiery)of  small bamboo shoots stirfried.

Next came the head of a silver carp from the nearby reservoir, in chilli oil, thick with chopped chillies, and served with noodles.

Seafood appears on almost every menu in Taiwan. The island is surrounded by waters that are rich with all forms of fish and crustaceans. You might think this dish would have been far too spicy, but the flavours were perfectly balanced and that huge fish head easily fed our large group.

Not finished yet, we progressed to chicken soup with mushrooms. Here's a hint for newbies to Chinese dining. When soup and rice appear, you can be sure that this signals the end of the savoury part of the meal. Chinese hosts do not like to think their hospitality leaves anyone with even a tiny bit of hunger remaining, so these are served to fill you up.

 
Desserts were a murcot mandarin cake with berries, and platters of seasonal fruit - watermelon, dragon fruit and green melon. At this point we struggled from our seats, to go off sightseeing!
 
What would be the cost for such an indulgent an excellent meal? NT$1500 + 10%. That's about A$70 per person.
 

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The Yehliu Geopark

 The only thing to do after such a large meal, was to walk it off, and what better place than a half-hour drive to one of Taipei's premier sites for people to visit.

At the entrance to the park you can study the the strange rock formations called 'hoodoos'. This is the name for the tall spires of rocks

No prizes for guessing the name of this one. Her face is changing as the elements sculpt her further, but if you want a photograph, be prepared to get in line behind a dozen or so others who want several selfies each!

The area is very popular with locals and tourists, and there are guards with whistles who monitor where people can or must not go. There are lines clearly marked which people are not allowed to cross. There is good reasons for this. At times large waves have been known to wash up on the rocks and the guards are there to make sure no one is at risk of being washed away.

In some places the rocks have been excavated into depressions called 'Fairy Shoes'. Other formations include the Beehive, the Ginger Rocks, and the Sea Candles. Some look like mushrooms or sea monsters, or you can make up your own names for them. It's a scenic and fun place to visit.

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Taipei Culinary Expo 2016

Just in case you think that we were just here for the markets and the indulgent dining and exciting scenery, I need to explain that we had been invited as delegates to the country's premier annual food event, the Taiwan Culinary Expo, held in the city's World Trade Center.

It was fascinating to see the presenters at the colourful and beautifully organised opening ceremony echoing the same words many nations are now using to describe their attitudes to food and dining. "Taiwan's era of pure food" was one phrase used to describe the country's return to original simple good tastes.

The Director General of Tourism was firm when stating his aims regarding food safety for tourists dining in Taiwan. He also noted that the country should focus on food mileage, origin and provenance of the food it uses, especially documenting who the growers are and the manner it has been raised. Organic food is of great importance, he stated.

Many top local chefs prepared special dishes for display, such as the ones above.

Almost as important the foods which would be served on them, are the dishes and plates, and there were displays of artisan ceramics and pottery.

The massive Exhibition Hall has seven floors. Since its opening in 1986, this site has become Asia’s most dynamic showground in the promotion of world trade and industry through the hosting of short and long term exhibitions. It would have been impossible in our short time there to explore every booth - but we tried!

Taiwan is also very conscious the cultural diversity in the country, and of course its influence on food and dining. There were many exhibitions of colourful (and often noisy) dances by various groups, including indigenous people. The sound of the music and singing was enough to draw people from across the halls to enjoy the spectacle.

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Market time!

If there is one thing I love to visit when travelling, it's a market. And in Asia, a night market is the icing on the cake. In the cooler evening  air filled with the exotic fragrance of spices and herbs and grilling meats, suddenly my tastebuds come alive again after the heat of a steamy day, and I can't wait to try as many things as possible.

Another good thing about night markets is that you get to see some very different dishes to those you might find on a menu in a restaurant. It is easier to pick and choose too, and maybe share a plate with friends. Like these cherry-red sausages, basted and brushed with chilli until they just glow.

Or eyeballs. Don't feel sick. These are not what they seem. Our guide orders a plastic bag with a few of these and we reach in with more than a little trepidation and pop them in our mouths only after she has assured us they are sweet. They turned out to be jellyish half-balls with a filling of red bean or coconut, kept cool in shaved ice, chewy and quite delicious.

The Raohe Street night market extends for several blocks of one street which by day would be filled with motor bikes and cars. Once evening comes, though, there are stands selling every possible thing you can think of to eat - including some you may not!

There's one you smell long before you see it. Stinky tofu is just as it sounds. A pungent smell not unlike what you get from a very ripe washed rind cheese, tells you it is somewhere near. The locals love it, but you may find it an acquired taste so come at it cautiously.

Of course there is every type of seafood available, freshly steamed, ready to be popped into a bag to snack on as you go.

We took some goodies with us as we left, and where better to chill out after a busy night at the markets than seated near the Rainbow Bridge over the Keelung river to the east of the city centre?

The Shilin night market is north of the Keelung River. Undercover, it draws you in, with souvenirs and clothes at the entrance.

It's not long, though, before the food becomes hard-core and you are surrounded by it in the bustling food court, that clatters with the clang of plates and people having a great time as they dine.

This is one of the most interesting 'cakes' I have ever seen. It's called a 'cake in a cake' and it happens this way....

First a flaky pastry 'cake' is made and deepfried. At the same time there are pancakes already made.

Order this, and the chef smashes a 'cake' and places it on the pancake, which is expertly rolled up in a moment, and served to you in a plastic wrapper. It's sweet, it's crunchy, it's pancakey.  I have no idea who created it first - or why – but everyone needs to try one at least once during a visit to Taiwan.

And then there is 'coffin bread'. The Taiwanese really have a way when it comes to naming dishes.

It's quite obvious really when you look at it. A 'box' of deep-fried bread is filled with a savoury, creamy, delicious filling, and the fried 'lid' is placed on top. It's hugely popular, as you can see from the range of options (above), and is actually a very sensible way to have your meal. 

Frog eggs may not do it for many people....... 

.. but the good news is, they are not the real deal. They may look similar, but this tapioca made dark to resemble frogs' eggs is served cold with aiyu jelly made from the seeds of a type of local fig, or sometimes it is mixed with shaved ice.

Sausages are a popular snack, sold in many places throughout the markets. Served on a stick they are the ideal takeaway snack. Watch out for wild boar sausages, a specialty here too.

 

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Dumpling time

Taipei 101 is the city's tallest building, and from 2004 until 2009 it was the world's  tallest. The tower is designed to withstand typhoons and earthquake tremors. The main tower features eight segments of eight floors each, because in Chinese-speaking cultures the number eight is associated with abundance, prosperity and good fortune.

It also resembles an Asian pagoda linking earth and sky, or a stalk of bamboo which represents learning and growth. If you have time, take the elevator to the Indoor Observation deck (88th and 89th floor) or the Outdoor Observation deck (91st floor) to enjoy the endless views across the city and beyond.

But instead of going up, we were off to taste something small and tasty nearby.

Not too many dumpling shops have managed to secure a Michelin star, but Din Tai Fung founded in Taipei in 1958, has repeatedly been rewarded with this honour, and is now known internationally, at its many restaurants worldwide, for its xiaolongbao, or soup dumpling.

Crews of staff work in the kitchens in full view of diners. Their concentration is exquisite as every dumpling must weigh 21 grams - that's 16 grams of filling and five grams of wrapper – and every one is weighed. There must be 18 folds at the top of each and the cooks work swiftly and silently in a flurry of floury speed, as the diners just keep coming through the doors. They know each of them will want many of these delicious morsels.

And while the soup dumplings are a must to try, there are so many others which come one after the other, such as these shrimp ones, or an amazing pork and truffle dumpling, pot stickers, similar to Japanese gyozu, chilli dumplings...

..fish dumplings made using the local tilapia fish, and then, telling us the end of this feast is near, sweet and sour soup and fried rice. 

All the time we are eating, those hard-working chefs just kept on rolling and filling, weighing and folding, while we marvelled at how these tiny things have created such a successful food empire. 

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We're off to  bake a cake

It had to happen. We couldn't just keep eating and tasting and accepting more and more food. Finally our hosts realised that we should be put to work. Pineapple cake is a popular dessert, a sort of sweetmeat to finish a heavy and complex meal - something the Taiwanese excel at serving to guest.

The Kuo Yuan Ye Museum of Cake and Pastry is much more than just a showcase, although it was fun to see the exhibits and even try on some ceremonial costumes. One part is dedicated to teaching visitors, school groups included, how to make the cake.

Now, I would share the recipe if I had been given it myself, but the chef was far too clever for that. He would not want us all to replicate this treat all over the world, so we each had a small work-station with just the exact amounts of flour and butter and icing sugar which we were instructed to beat together with an egg before we placed small balls of the dough in specially-made tins ready for baking.

When they were out of the oven, we then were given wrappers and instructed to carefully wrap each tiny loaf and place it in the box. Just like a bought one! Delicious they were too, when we tried them later.

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Taiwanese icons

Taiwanese beer is obviously the correct choice to drink with Taiwanese food. Taiwan Beer originated from a government agency established by Taiwan's Japanese rulers in 1901. Taiwan Beer is an amber lager with a distinct taste produced by the addition of locally produced ponlai rice (Formosa rice ) during the fermentation process. Formosa was the old name for Taiwan.

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Motor bikes and scooters are the most popular form of transport in Taipei. They are affordable, easy to park in congested areas - and you can fit the whole family on them!

Here you can see a family of four ready to head off home from the shops. I particularly liked the fact that one of the children even had his own wheels.

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Vegetarian and vegan food is widely available in Taiwan. Of course tofu (soya bean curd) is an ideal protein source to replace meats. 

This dish often appears in mainstream Chinese restaurants, but before steaming, the lotus leaves here were filled with a vegetable mixture instead of chicken.

It was a busy and beautiful restaurant which made graceful use of natural timber in its decor. I was grateful for the small sign on this otherwise camouflaged door.

+++++

Taipei has a number of fine hotels that would sit proudly in any city in the world. 

The Palais de Chine, where we stayed for our last night in Taipei, was as much a museum as a hotel. The moody lighting, exquisite artefacts and ambience somehow channeled Paris, connecting that city to this island in Asia.

The hotel's location to the north of Taipei's main rail station was ideal too, as next day we discovered a web of shopping centres underground within easy walking distance.

It really was too good an opportunity to miss....

....especially as we had these burning holes in our pockets! Taiwan's EasyCard is available at MRT stations, and can also be used for small purchases from hundreds of stores including 7-Eleven and other convenience stores.

Luckily by the time it was lunchtime we had discovered a massive food hall, deep under the city. There was every sort of food: Japanese, like the beef noodle dish (above)....

...French breads, cheeses, vegetarian, and much more.

Then, just as we were almost ready to leave Taiwan, we discovered a Mr Brown cafe, and had to complete the circle by enjoying another of this brand's coffees. 

We had discovered Mr Brown on Day One of our trip, ten days before, and the other side of the country.

I always find the last meal in a country is rather sad. I think of all the wonderful foods we have tried, and know that some we will never taste again.

At Sian Ding Wei, appropriately a seafood restaurant, we sit in a back room on small stools, supping on pippies and clams in a vegetable broth.

This dish of sardines on lettuce, with just salt and a wedge of lemon, perhaps shows what is best about the food of Taiwan. There is flavour and fire - heaps of it when needed – but restraint too, allowing simple flavours and fine produce speak loudly.

About to board our China Airlines flight at Taipei airport, we see a final sign of Taipei's cultural strength. Not just food for the body is available here, but food for the mind!

Perhaps this picture sums up our time in Taipei better than anything else. Of course those love-locks have been placed there by lovers, eager to show their affection.

Yet, as I looked at it, I couldn't help but wonder what it might be like if all the people who visit this city (those who had loved discovering Taipei and indeed Taiwan itself) what if they each were to add a padlock as an expression of how they feel about this country and its people?

If that happened, I am sure the city would need to invest in a much larger LOVE sign!

++++

Sally & Gordon Hammond visited Taiwan at the invitation of Taiwan Tourism Bureau.

Words and images: ©Sally Hammond

Video: ©Gordon Hammond

 

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Taste of Sydney is on again SOON!

Read all about it HERE (and make sure you check the special ticket offer!)

 


India's best-kept secret - a state of excitement and mystery.

Discover why you should go there....

 


 

Fells and dales, gingerbread, shaggy sheep and weird standing stones.

But please don't call the lake a loch!

 


 

Glasgow is shaking off its grey reputation.....

... becoming colourful - and tasty!

 


 

Still find all the food and fun of Central Taiwan ....

...HERE

 


From the valleys to the seaside - sharing the surprises of South Wales.

See more here..... 

 


Lovely green Kerala has a friendly welcome for everyone.

Meet the locals here...

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Edinburgh, Scotland's capital city, is full of surprises!

See for yourself....

 


 

Can't get enough of Singapore?

Find out how to get more for your money too....

 


 

Why does dining on an island always seem so much better?

Meet some of the best places to test this theory....

 


 

FIFTY places and foods you may (or may not!) recognise.

TEST yourself....

 


 

The world's BIGGEST war memorial. HINT: it's in Australia.

Find out why and how....

 


 

Meet the courageous Japanese city that is embracing the future.

Learn where it is....

 


 

The Blue Mountains have much to offer - summer or winter.

Check out the history too...

 


 

A cruise around south-east Asia uncovers some fascinating secrets.

Find out where...

 



 

So you thought throwing the wedding bouquet was strange....

See what happens in other countries!

 


 

If you like beer, this could be helpful when you travel.

Useful phrases....

 


Pack your Big Yellow Suitcase ...

... find out where you can take it!

 


 



 

 

tastethis

 

AUSTRALIAN FOOD EVENTS 2017

Taste of Sydney, March 9-12 (special ticket offer)

Crab Fest, Mandurah, WA, March 18-19

Melbourne Food & Wine Festival, March 31-April 9

Yarra Valley Wine & Food Festival, Victoria, April 1-2, 2017

Noosa Food & Wine Festival, Qld, May 18-21.

Fine Food Australia 2017, Sydney, 11-14 September

 


RECIPE TIME

Something quick and tasty, a chicken bake hearty enough for everyone.

See the recipe.....

 


 
Anyone want a slice of Granny's currant pie?
 
 
 

 

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Think you have tasted every oil on the market? You may not have tried this one.

See more.....

 


 

Have you heard of oyster leaves?

Here they are.....

 


 

You mean they can make this from bananas?

Read more...

 


 

Design your own chocolates. It's not difficult.

Find out more....

 


 

A fruity beer? This Australian company likes a challenge.

Take a look...

 


scc

Need a coffee????

stay in touch on the FB page.

Taste_03

Hear a podcast

 
 
diningtop

Top chef has found a new Abode at ParkRoyal Darling Harbour.

Food you have to taste...

 



 

Lot 1 near Wynyard, this one is worth knowing about too.

Find out more....

 



 

Woollahra's BUZO has evolved.

Find out about the Evolution menu....

 

dining_bottom

 


 

takeabreak_top

TAKE A BREAK

++++++++++++++++

 

Find out what US food events are on in

FEBRUARY 2017

and what is coming up WORLDWIDE

 


 

Go glamping in Queensland - luxury in the rainforest.

The best of both worlds...

 


 

food and wine tour in one of France's most beautiful regions.

Learn more about it...

 


 

Meet Derek the wombat. What could be cuter?

Find him in Tasmania....

 


 

Add some craic to your Christmas!

To be sure, you'll love it....

 


 

Take a walk in Japan and feel refreshed.

See more...

 


 

A year of fabulous food festivals in 2017 for Britain!

Find out when and where....

 


 

Festivals throughout Australia too in 2017.

Check these out...

 


 

Scotland's Year of Food and Drink 2017....

...what's on?

 


Festivals in Korea, 2017

Here they are....

 


 

2017 Malaysia's Year of Festivals....

Find out when and where...

 


What's happening in Rome this month....

Check it out here...

 


 

Ever dreamed of having your own place in France.

This may make it easier....

 


Now you can travel and pick up some artistic skills - and enjoy Italian cuisine.

...find out where

 


 

 

Looking for a way to spend your weekends in Australia this year? 

Here are 52 suggestions complete with things to do and places to eat....

Read more..

 

 

 


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Sally, and Gordon Hammond also operate the Australian Regional Food Guide Web site. This comprehensive directory is a great resource for everything that is happening in the regional food scene in Australia. Make sure you visit and bookmark this site. Please Follow on Twitter or Like on Facebook.