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Favourite Food

&

Travel quotes

 

The best way to know a city is to eat it.― Scott Westerfeld, Afterworlds

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Every day is a journey, and the journey itself is home.― Matsuo Bashō

 



National days.....

 

 

Eritrea 24 May (Eritrean independence from Ethiopia 1993)

On the Ethiopian table...

Trivia: Eritrea's capital city Asmara is also called the "Italy's African City" or "New Rome". This, due to the distinctive Italian touch it exudes. More facts....

 


 

Bermuda 24 May (Originally Queen Victoria's birthday; now "Bermuda Day" to celebrate the islands' heritage and culture)

Dining in Bermuda.....

Trivia: The typical breakfast in Bermuda is codfish and potatoes. More facts...

 


 

Argentina 25 May (First Patriotic Government, the Spanish viceroy is removed and replaced by the Primera Junta during the May Revolution

On the Argentinean menu...

Trivia: Argentineans celebrate Friend’s Day, a day dedicated entirely to friendships. and everyone gets together late at night to celebrate friendship on July 20th. More facts....

 


 

Jordan 25 May (Independence Day, from the United Kingdom 1946)

Dining in Jordan...

Trivia: The Jordanians believe that praising children excessively can invite bad luck and is generally avoided. More facts...

 

 

Georgia 26 May (Day of First Republic, declaration of independence from Russia 1918)

What's on the Georgian table?

Trivia: Georgia is considered the birthplace of the wine. On the territory of present-day Georgia found the oldest remains of wine jugs and vines. Georgian wine is just awesome. Be sure to try it. Georgians are proud of their wine. More facts...

 


 

Armenia 28 May (Republic Day, independence from the Transcaucasian Democratic Federative Republic 1918)

On the table in Armenia....

Trivia: The first church in the world, Holy Etchimiadzin was built in the world back in the early 4th century. More...

 


 

Ethiopia 28 May (Downfall of the Derg Day, the Derg regime is defeated 1991)

Dining in Ethiopia...

Trivia: Coffee was first discovered by a goat herder in the Kaffa region. He noticed his goats pacing restlessly after eating the coffee plant. More....

 


 

Nepal 28 May (Nepal a federal republic 2008, earlier the king's birthday)

The cuisine of Nepal....

Trivia: Nepal is home to one of the few places on earth where you can see both the Bengal tiger and the one-horned rhinoceros. More...

 


 

Azerbaijan 28 May (Republic Day, independence from the Transcaucasian Democratic Federative Republic 1918)

Azerbaijani cuisine....

Trivia: The first known fireplace and construction in human history, dating from 700,000 to 500,000 years ago, was discovered in Azikh Cave, the largest cave in AzerbaijanMore.....

 


 

See all National Days for MAY

 


 

Food related events....

Strangest US food festivals in 2016

Food festivals around the world in  MAY....

 

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Food related events on this date in history!

 


 

oldfoodie

...visit The Old Foodie.

 



 

See where we have been...

24 percent of the world's countries!

 


 

Australian travellers - do you need a visa?

Check the visa requirements by country...

Read more....

 

 

traveltipstop

 

Ten fun things you can be covered for by travel insurance.

Find out what they are....

 


 

Here's an update on the US HAZMAT rules for aircraft luggage.

 

 

 


food_of_week_02

How about the world's priciest cheese for a Christmas gift your a friend who is a cheese lover?

Find out more.....

 


triviatop

ciaos

To go with this week's feature...

Here are some fun facts about Japan...

 

 

Heaven! Cruising on a barge in France with other people to serve you.

Find out more here...


 

 

books

.............and Apps and DVDs


 

If you think you know Australia well, you need to see this book and realise there is still more.

Read more...

 


 

Sydney has many precincts and now you may explore them.

See what you may have been missing out on....

 


 

Have you been to Berlin? This book will make you want to visit.

Read more....

 


 

Something for every day of the year from famous writers and speakers through the ages.

Read more.....

 


 

Now you can cook all your favourite foods from Japan's capital.

Find out about it...

 


 

Here's a book with double value.

Find out what it is.....

 


 

India has some of the best vegatarian dishes in the world.

Find them in this new book....

 


 

Chef-farmer Matthew Evans helps us through hot weather cooking.

Read more...

 


 

Could this be the el Bulli of Australia?

Find out why.....

 


 

Spend some time with Australia's 'Queen of Nyona'.

Learn her history and Asian cooking secrets....

 


 

Looking for a way to spend your weekends in Australia in 2016? 

Here are 52 suggestions complete with things to do and places to eat....

Read more..

 


 

 

Hate waste? Want to feed your family healthily?

Get preserving....

 


 

Frustrated by a fridge full of leftovers? Don't know what to do with them?

Your worries are over....

 


 

It's not often a Michelin-starred chef shares his favourite home-style recipes.

Get the help of an expert...

 


 

Attention! All those who thought they would never cook Japanese food at home!

A leading chef show you how....

 


 

How to eat like an Italian! 

Fratelli Fresh's Barry McDonald gives the recipes you need....

 


 

Lovers of Middle Eastern food will devour this book - and its wonderful recipes.

Read more...

 


 

Too old to colour-in? Not with this delightful book.

Release your inner child...

 


Michelin starred chef Jason Atherton would like to assist you in your kitchen...

.... that is, his amazing dessert cookbook will.

 


 

Outback food from a Masterchef contestant.

See what the country has to offer....

 


NEW from Lonely Planet

&

See more...

 


 

Meatballs for everyone - from the Meatball and Wine Bar.

Read about them...

 


 

Lovers of food and beer, need to see this latest book from Ross Dobson.

Find out more.....

 


 

Perfect for summer. Hartsyard shares its secrets.

Learn them all....


 

Aimed at the food industry, but also valuable for home cooks, this tongue-in-cheek book might make you think.

Read more...

 


 

One of the delights of travel is eating on the street.

This book helps you cook the food at home too...

 


 

One family of foods can help you eat your way to health!

Find out how....

 


 

Heart-shaped Tasmania is all about good food.

Find out who is making it even better ........

 


 

How big is your garden? Even a tiny courtyard is big enough to add to your menu.

Find out how....

 


 

The best of the best. Iconic cookery teacher Gretta Anna's recipes with her son Martin Teplitzky.

See it here....

 


 

Food is art - and here, a master chef  marries Italian cuisine and painting.

Find out more about a truly beautiful book ...

 


For those who love the world and its beauty and want a REAL life.....

.....this is the book for you.

 


 

Fancy some fishing - with a chef and TV celebrity and two other seafood experts?

Go fishing (and cooking) with these there....

 


 

Healthy, beautiful and well-fed?

Now you can be....

 


 

Heading for Hong Kong? Take this book (and an appetite) with you!

Read all about it.....

 


Explore 19 areas and discover Tokyo's best food and shopping.

Read more....

 


 

Find your way around a new country - greet the locals, eat the food...

Explore with Marco Polo!

 


 

Everyone's favourite grandmother and cook, as known by her grand-daughter, Kate Gibbs....

....sharing her recipes for life , and for the kitchen

 


 

Now you can create your own home patisserie.

A top French patissier shows how....

 


 

Does Australia have the world's best beaches?

Find out where Australia's best ones are....


 

Join five women for a weekly meal in Umbria, Italy - simple, but so much more.

Find out about this beautiful book... 

 


 

Adriano Zumbo is king of the A-Z of sweets, desserts and pastries.

Now you can learn his secrets...

 


 

If Thai cookery has always been too difficult...

This is the book for you....

 


You probably know of Rick Stein from his TV and cookbook fame, as well as his restaurants...

..but now you can get to know him from his memoir

 


Put the Taste of Australia into your meals with Lyndey Milan's latest book.

Read more....

 


 

Fresh from the West - chef Sophie Zalokar's delicious recipes using local south-west Western Australian produce.

 

Read more....

 


If you are a reader of food blogs, this behind the scenes peep at the real story, will captivate.

Read more.....

 


America-bound travellers, take note! 

The fully revised edition is now  available....

 


Love cooking, like trivia?

This book is for you!

 


Burma is a mystery to many people. Its food is even more obscure.

Read this and be delighted...

 

 

 

 

Window on Malaysia's highlands

Mention Malaysia and, after the food (always a hot topic!) what do people remember most?

That's right, the heat. Peninsular Malaysia is located just north of the equator: it lies between 3-6 degrees of latitude, north, to be exact. This means the temperature rarely wavers more than a few degrees either. With averages around 30C year-round, and up to 90 percent humidity, for those who don't like that sort of climate (me!) it can spoil the enjoyment of an otherwise great place.

 

However - on a recent trip to the 'cool' part of the country, we found relief - and a LOT to love. This is where the colonial British came over 80 years ago and built hill-stations to escape the heat, high in the Titiwangsa Mountains, the rocky spine of the Malay peninsula. They had learned that trick in India and continued the habit here, constructing colonial mansions, playing golf and growing lush cool-climate gardens.

While the climate is still the same, and shreds of colonialism remain, today's independent Malaysia is very different. Notice that even traffic signs are in Bahasa Malaysia, the official language. Can you guess what the red sign, above, means?

And while that large sign to Genting (pronounced as in Gents) seems straightforward, we had become almost inextricably lost, self-driving from Johor Bahru, and taken hours longer than expected to reach Gohtong Jaya, the small town which was to be our base for our first mountain experience.

Finally we reached the DZH Health Resort just a minute or so walk from the towns' thriving strip of Chinese restaurants and cafes, 168 shops (equivalent of our 24/7s - work it out!), food carts and, inexplicably, a Vietnamese bakery (Backerei under the Your Hotel) where we indulged in superb pastries and authentic drip coffee each morning of our stay.

 

Next day we headed up the escarpment towards Resorts World Genting, the mistily magnificent mass of buildings just visible on the horizon. Yet, even with this prize awaiting, twenty minutes up the winding road, the sight of a huge pagoda was an invitation for us to take time out and explore.

The huge Jin Swee Caves Temple opened in 1994, and is yet another aspect of the vision of Dr Lim Goh Tong, the founder of Genting's many attractions. 

Spiritual below, secular far above.

The temple and its grounds have everything from sobering caves depicting the Ten Chambers of Hell, complete with graphically suffering figurines and symbols, to places which are fun for children too.

 

Here is the man behind it all, Dr Lim Goh Tong. Born in 1918 in China's Fujian province, he arrived in Malaya in 1937, learned the language, became a builder, then moved on to huge construction projects. In 1969 began plans for what has become today a major tourist venue, just 55 kilometres from the capital, Kuala Lumpur.  

No expense was spared in creating the finest temple possible and the project took 18 years to complete. This giant Buddha presides at the end of the Journey to Enlightenment, reached by a path passing those caves of hell.

But, surely as the founder wanted and expected, once the faithful visitors have prayed for good fortune at the temple, the only place to head for is the top of the mountain, a ten-minute drive away.

Over the past decades the various accommodation and entertainment options in the Genting Highlands have morphed into the giant Resorts World GentingHere, Malaysia's first and only casino, five top resort hotels with upmarket cafes, restaurants, bars and shops, cinemas and theatres, attempt to offer something for everyone. There is no 'town' as such; the complex has become the centre.

The hotels are beyond grand; many seem larger than life, and even the sight of the mythic kingdom from far below, a constellation of lights on the night skyline, it is jaw-dropping.

But for me, this was the best thing of all. Just look at that temperature on the billboard! In KL, almost visible in the mists of the coast far off below, it would be fifteen degrees hotter. Here, at an altitude of 1740 metres, there is a ski-village feel - underlined by a cable-car connection from Gotong Jaya to the metropolis of high-rise buildings

Back at Gohtong Jaya, we find the reason many other people love this cooler climate: the chance to enjoy freshly-grown strawberries.

And if you grow them, you can then turn them into a tourist attraction too - one that all ages will enjoy.

By nightfall, though, the unmistakable odour of durian wafts over the town's one main street. Not just any durian, though. This is the finest of the 'king of fruits' - the king of kings.

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The good thing about the Malaysian highlands is the mix of cool-climate and tropical. On the road to the Cameron Highlands, several hours' drive north next day, we pass this weird offering. We could see it was the remains of jackfruit, the world's largest fruit, but who or what would want to pull off to the side of the road and buy this?

As we talked to the woman who was extracting the globes of flesh from these jackfruit, we found our answer. The fibrous dried pith is used as fodder for animals.

But there were more surprises in store for us on this journey. Over twenty kilometres south of the town where we were to stay, unexpectedly the hillsides came packaged in plastic. We had seen the white splashes on the hills from a distance, but on coming closer we discovered hectares of plants of all kinds, growing undercover. 

For several kilometres we passed these tunnels, hothouses for flowers, greens, vegetables and berries: a market garden of gargantuan proportions.

Plainly, the cool climate that lured the overheated British is now being employed for a different result.

If the Genting Highlands are 'cool' in a chic, extravagant, glitzy way, then the Cameron Highlands, at an elevation of 1524 metres, are cool in temperature. This is where tea thrives, and has done so for many years at this roadside plantation just outside of Tanah Rata, one of the region's two major towns.

The vista, over the carpet of tea bushes that yield 70,000 kilograms of green tea leaves which are plucked each week, is calming and extremely photogenic. Many visitors choose to linger a while in the tearooms - and of course have a cup of tea!

The Cameron Valley Tea plantation, one of several plantations with tearooms in the area, began in 1933. The Cameron Highlands opened up when, in 1885 following British colonization, British researcher Sir William Cameron was commissioned to explore parts of hitherto unmapped Malaysia.

Cameron reached Ipoh and tracked the River Kinta to its source. Upon arrival at the top of nearby Mount Chabang the group noted mild temperatures, ranging from 8C to 20C and, tantalisingly, were able to glimpse a number of plateaus with heights ranging from 1340 to 1800 meters above sea level.

Our room for the two nights we had in Tanah Rata was at Century Pines Resort. It is one of the earlier buildings in town and we were to see old black and white photographs of it later, dating from when it was new.

The highlands lie in the state of Pahang, Malaysia's third-largest state. While the British colonialists may have originally come to this area for the climate and a good cuppa, we found the town alive with people of all ages wearing backpacks and sturdy boots. Jungle trekking is the attraction now, and they come to hike the jungle trails, photograph the wildlife, and maybe sight a civet cat, a mongoose, or monkeys. Some  take the two-hour trail to the summit of Mount Brinchang (2032m) or on another four hours to Mount Irau, even higher.

History is cool here too. The Cameron Highlands Resort is built as a long extension from an existing 1930s cottage with architecture dating from the 1870s.

Channeling another age, the nostalgic interiors hark back to its grand colonial heritage with tall French doors, timber-beamed ceilings and plantation shutters combined with heritage colours.

The resort overlooks the 18-hole golf course, as green and as much in favour as it would have been eighty years ago. Originally created to suit the ex-pat demographic who made this area their bolthole decades ago, it began with a six-hole golf course in 1935. In the early days, the club was patronised by the wealthy, and back then, it was common to find tiger paw prints in the bunkers. Certainly that would be an incentive to keep moving.

For those who might remember the era, or just love a good dose of history, the Time Tunnel in the larger centre of Brinchang a couple of kilometres further north of Tanah Rata, is the place to come. Here, for just a few ringgit entry fee, you can be transported back to the beginnings of life in this area, zoom past the British era and into the events surrounding Merdeka, and then the present day.

Allow some time to spend here, as it is crammed with photographs, models, memorabilia and displays, and it has to be one of the best and most comprehensive local displays you will ever find.

Even Australia gets a mention.

If you thought that Gohtong Jaya was strawberry-centric, then the Cameron Highlands does it bigger and better.

There is even strawberry coffee to try. It is unusual, and unusually good....

... and nothing makes a better selfie than having a giant strawberry in the background.

Behind the Time Tunnel is a strawberry farm - but not just any old one....

... this is a 'self plucking' one. I guess others would call it 'pick your own'.

While the  two towns have moved on to become contemporary Malaysian centres, still some grand old places remain. The 1939-built smokehouse is one, and there are others that reprise the era of British colonialism. At Ye Olde Smokehouse you can sit down and crook your little finger as you sip on fine locally grown tea accompanied by scones and jam and cream.

Meanwhile just a couple of blocks away the townscape features high-rise apartments and hotels, bustling street markets and, of course.... those ubiquitous strawberries!

The whole area is a green-thumb's paradise. Bee farms, orchids, flowers, fruit are available to see, buy, learn about, or simply admire.

At Cactus Point, heading northwards towards the road to Ipoh, there is every type of prickly plant as well as succulents - and yes, you guessed it - more strawberries!

In the town of Tanah Rata, the dining seems slanted towards the itinerant visitors, with everything from chicken and chips to Turkish, Malay and Chinese restaurants. We fell for Restoran Kumar, the name suggesting the Indian offerings available. Tandoor, dosa, murtabak, rice dishes: the standard was good, the food tasty, service speedy and friendly. We looked twice, though, at the bill as it all seemed so cheap.

Returning along the highland road, we stopped to see another relic of the past, overlooking a jade green lake. The Lakehouse Cameron Highlands is built in Mock Tudor style as so many of the original buildings in the region were. It dates from 1966, and was built by Colonel Foster, a retired British Army man who wanted to run his own bed and breakfast. The Lakehouse now operates as a boutique hotel.

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(credit: Veera)

Our final destination in the highlands was south again, about an hour north of Genting. Fraser's Hill is cool in yet another way. This is the place you come to chill out and relax. It's a place for getting close to nature, and is the venue for a major annual bird spotting event. Despite the name, no birds are raced. It is, instead, a contest between twitchers to see how many species they can identify in a given time. Teams can spot as many as 75 species in this event.

 

The highlands are still yielding hauls of timber as these huge trunks show, and some people are concerned about its effect on the environment.

On the way south we stopped at this place in the town of Raub, which despite the name is no secret. Secret Recipe is in the top 10 of Malaysia's franchises, and is best known for its decadent cakes.

I am fairly sure that this fellow, who we met shortly afterwards on the way to Fraser's Hill, was not a cake lover, but he was tearing into fruit which someone must have shared with him. He was a big heavy fellow and we felt it best to keep the window up for this photograph.

Fraser's Hill (Bukit Fraser, in the local language) is reached by a narrow, winding one-way road. Giant bamboo sways over the road, and there's the occasional landslip and uprooted trees. Fraser's Hill derives its name from a Scottish trader, Louis James Fraser, whose tin-ore trading post in the 1890s was of interest to the British army who had not explored the area, and felt that he could help them. Fraser and his guides prospected for gold or other valuable metals on the ridges and, at the top almost totally in clouds, he discovered an ancient forest of moss-draped trees and ferns. On finding rich tin deposits, he opened a mine in the area.

Today the tiny town of Fraser's Hill is manicured and tidy, its clock tower the focus.

This photo from 1970 shows the town centre before it was built. (credit: Veera)

To show the dual language of the clock tower's background, one side displays Fraser's Hill, and the other Bukit Fraser, here appropriately being used by local young ladies for a selfie.

With no casino, only a couple of very small shops, no nightlife, markets, (or even strawberry farms) just why do people come here, and what is there to do? This signpost proves the area's popularity, and the many visitors generally are simply looking for peace and quiet and a chance to get closer to nature, walking (watching out for the occasional tiger!) birdwatching and taking pictures.

There are many comfortable lodges and resorts in Fraser's Hill as well as houses using the colonial term of 'bungalow', where the food is good, comfort is paramount, and tea and scones in the afternoon wouldn't be entirely out of the question.

We found such a place at the aptly-named Buona Vista, meaning 'beautiful view' which is tucked into the jungle up another winding one-way road. Many know this as Stephen's Place as owner Stephen Hogg has created quite a fan club from those who have stayed here. Stephen is himself an accomplished wildlife photographer with an encyclopedic knowledge of the local flora, fauna, snakes and insects.

Understandably the four well-appointed bedrooms in his property are in great demand from scientists, camera enthusiasts, birdwatchers and lovers of wildlife. 

The trees are alive with birdsong on the property, and there are oyther creatures too. We were told that tiny squirrels have been photographed drinking water from these flowers that hung just a few metres from our bedroom door.

Stephen and his wife Salmiah are passionate about feeding their family and guests on healthy food, much of it made with ingredients grown or raised on the property. This breakfast spread features homemade bread, eggs from the hens in the back yard, and homemade sausages - and it was, of course, delicious.

After dark, the lawns are set up with cameras to capture images of visiting nocturnal animals. Luckily for us a civet cat was polite enough to amble out of the bushes while we were there. Watch for its appearance on the video! It was exciting and we had the faint feeling of being in the midst of a research project.

Stephen  has a particular interest in moths and butterflies, and this fist-sized beauty obligingly posed nearby on a branch to be photographed.

Back in town again, we discover another Smokehouse, a relic of the colonial age too. This one has been offering 'traditional English country house hospitality since 1937'.

And once again a golf course - of course! Malaysia's earliest highland golf course was constructed in 1925, the original nine-hole course built on Fraser's former tin mines. In the 1970s, an 18-hole course was added.

In the small souvenir shop adjoining the Post Office in the centre of town, this top says it all, over fifty years after the British left Malaysia. Of course it's made with long sleeves to suit the chill of the highlands. 

Malaysia's highlands have something for everyone: respite from the heat, sweeping panoramas, places to play, shop and hike, and plenty of space to relax and recalibrate the senses in the beauty of nature.

All come away winners from this little-known but very special region.

More information on Malaysia.....

Pahang tourism information....

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Text and photos: ©Sally Hammond

Video: ©Gordon Hammond

Sally and Gordon Hammond travelled to this region independently.

 
 

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Walk on the quiet side in Japan.

Find out more...

 


 

Here are FIFTY of the world's friendliest faces.

See them all....

 


A bay named for a predator? A 400-year-old plate? Aliens? What sort of place is this?

Find out here....

 


 

A quarter of a millennium is a long time to be creating spirits.

Who has set this record?

 


 

Which Australian chocolate-maker is a hundred years old this year?

Learn more...

 


 

The lovely Hunter Valley, NSW, has something for everyone.

Find out its secrets....

 


 

Take an 'international trip' but stay in Sydney!

Find out how to do this.....

 


 

Perth - the world's most remote capital which has everything - dolphins included!

Read more..... 

 


 

If you like beer, this could be helpful when you travel.

Useful phrases....

 


 

Pack your Big Yellow Suitcase ...

... find out where you can take it!

 

 

 


 

 

tastethis

 


DON'T MISS THESE:

2016

AUSTRALIAN FOOD EVENTS

Noosa Food and Wine Festival, Queensland, 20-22 May, 2016

Foodservice Australia 2016, Sydney, May 22-24, 2016

Cake Bake & Sweets Show Sydney, June 3-5 2016

 


 

RECIPE TIME

Bourek is a tasty Middle Eastern dish. But what if you can't find a filling to suit everyone?

This version suits everyone....

 


 

Blood oranges are in season and they team beautifully with fennel.

See the recipe.....

 


 

Don't be fooled! This is a giant-sized chocolate truffle.

(recipe and pic courtesy of Sugar Hero)

See how to make it....

 


 

 MUST TASTE THIS

If burrata is not a cheese you know, then do try this Gold medal Sydney-made one.

Find out more...

 


They're calling it the mayo for the masses - soy, dairy, egg, nut and gluten free.

Find out more....

 


scc

Need a coffee????

This app is now unavailable but you can still stay in touch on the FB page.

Taste_03

Hear a podcast

 
 
diningtop

 

This Italian cheese-maker serves it up at the table....then sells the makings upstairs.

Can you guess where it is?

++++

 

..and then there's Andy, the Irish cherry pie maker on the north coast of NSW...

...see what Coolongolook has!

dining_bottom

 


 

takeabreak_top

TAKE A BREAK

++++++++++++++++

 

Find out what food events are on around the world in MAY

 


 

Looking for a way to spend your weekends in Australia in 2016? 

Here are 52 suggestions complete with things to do and places to eat....

Read more..

 


 

A centrally-located luxury Sydney hotel has some deals you may like for the holiday season.

Find out more....

 


 

So you want to explore SYDNEY?

This new app is just what you need.....

 


 

A year of fabulous food festivals is ahead in 2016 for Britain!

Find out when and where....

 


 

Festivals throughout Australia too in 2016.

Check these out...

 


 

Scotland's Year of Food and Drink 2016....

...what's on?

 


Festivals in Korea, 2016

Here they are....

 


 

2016 Malaysia's Year of Festivals....

Find out when and where...

 


What's happening in Rome this month....

Check it out here...

 


 

Ever dreamed of having your own place in France.

This may make it easier....

 


 

SPOIL YOURSELF -    TOTAL LUXURY

Tour the world in a luxury private jet .....

But wait, there's more.....

 


 

Where better to take a French cookery course.....


...than in Paris?


 

Taste Miami with someone who knows.

See how to do it...

 


 

Shopping in Paris is great fun - but you might need some help...

...and not just with carrying your purchases!

Find out more.....

 


 

food and wine tour in one of France's most beautiful regions.

Learn more about it...

 


 

Now you can travel and pick up some artistic skills - and enjoy Italian cuisine.

...find out where

 


 

SYDNEY'S LIVING HISTORY

Find out about the (sometimes colourful) past of  Australia's first city:

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Sally, and Gordon Hammond also operate the Australian Regional Food Guide Web site. This comprehensive directory is a great resource for everything that is happening in the regional food scene in Australia. Make sure you visit and bookmark this site. Please Follow on Twitter or Like on Facebook.